Sunday, April 6, 2014

Prices Reduced for California Online DUI Classes by Tom Wilson Counseling Center


Prices Reduced for California Online DUI Classes as Well as Longer Online DUI Classes for Other States

At Tom Wilson Counseling Center, we are constantly looking for new ways to improve our customer value and satisfaction. This includes periodically reviewing our expenses and price lists.

I am pleased to share that we have decided to reduce our price for online DUI classes that are 32 hours in length or longer. As of 4/1/2014, the price will drop from $18.75 per class hour to $15.00 per hour. For example, our old price for a 32 hour online AB541 DUI class for non- residents of California was $600.00, and the new price will be $480.00. We will continue to offer no-interest payment plans. We believe that this new price not only gives customers a great value, but it also reflects our commitment to customer satisfaction.

Customers who require a 32 hour class for other states will experience the same cost saving,

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Top Ten Tips for Parents for Preventing Drug Abuse in their Kids

Top Ten Tips for Parents for Preventing Drug Abuse in their Kids


1. Why is there so much focus on keeping kids alcohol and drug free?
Recent scientific research has found that the longer an individual postpones the onset (first use) of alcohol, tobacco or other drug use, the less likely the individual is to develop an addiction or other lifelong problems, including depression.

2. The Power of Parents: Believe it or not, parents are the most powerful influence on their kids when it comes to drugs. Recent research has found that 2 out of 3 kids ages 13-17 say that losing their parents’ respect is one of the main reasons they don’t drink alcohol, smoke marijuana or use other drugs.

So then, as a parent, what can I do use my influence to encourage or promote prevention efforts with my children? Here are Ten Tips for Parents:

1) Don’t Be Afraid to be the “Bad” Parent: Sometimes, our fear of negative reaction from our kids keeps us from doing what is right. When it comes to alcohol and drugs, taking a tough stand can help our children to say no….“my mom or my dad would kill me if I drank or used.” Our decisions and our rules allow our child to use us as “the reason” for not using alcohol or drugs.

2) Connect With Your Child’s Friends: Pay attention to who your child is hanging out with, who’s coming to the house and get to know them. Encourage your child’s friends to come to your home, invite them for dinner and make them feel welcomed. Encourage your child to invite friends over to the house.

3) Make Connections With Other Parents Too: As you get to know your kids friends, take the opportunity to introduce yourself to his/her parents. It’s a great way to build mutual support and share your rules about alcohol and drugs. And, it will make it easier for you to call if your son/daughter is going to a party at their house to make sure that there will be responsible parental supervision.

4) Promote Healthy Activities: Help your kids, and their friends, learn how to have fun, and fight off the dreaded “I’m bored.” Physical games, activities and exercise are extremely important because of the positive physical and mental benefits. Encourage kids to become engaged in other school and community activities such as music, sports, arts or a part-time job. The more your children are active, the less time they have to get caught up in the pressure from peers to drink alcohol and use drugs.

5) Establish Clear Family Rules About Alcohol and Drugs: Setting specific, clear rules is the foundation for parental efforts in prevention, some ideas:
  • Kids under 21 will not drink alcohol
  • Kids will not ride in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs
  • Older brothers and sisters will not encourage younger kids to drink or use drugs
  • Kids under 21 will not host parties at our home without parental supervision
  • Kids will not stay at a kid’s party where alcohol or drugs are present.
  • Consistent enforcement of the rules, with consequences, if needed is essential. Without consequences the rules have no value and will not work.
6) Get Educated About Alcohol and Drugs: You cannot rely on your own personal experiences or common sense to carry you through. Your ability to provide family leadership in prevention requires you to be better educated. Share what you are learning with your spouse and your kids.

7) Be a Role Model and Set a Positive Example: Bottom line…. from a kid’s perspective, what you do is more important than what you say! Research studies show that parents who drink alcohol or use drugs are more likely to have kids who drink or use. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation; if you use medication, use only as directed, and do not use illegal drugs. If you host a party, always serve alternative non-alcoholic beverages and do not let anyone drink and drive.

8) Keep Track of Your Child’s Activities: Asking questions, keeping track, checking in are all important. Research has found that young people who are not regularly monitored by their parents are four times more likely to use alcohol or drugs. Make the time to know what is happening in your child’s life – especially in families where both parents work outside of the home, life is busy but you must find time for your children – know what they are up to!

9) Keep Track of Alcohol and Prescription Drugs: For kids, the most common source of alcohol and prescription drugs is parents. Make sure that your home is not a source of alcohol or prescription drugs for your kids or their friends.

10) Get Help!: If at any point you suspect that your child is having a problem with alcohol and/or drugs (What to Look For), get help. Don’t wait. You are not alone.

Tom Wilson is a Certified Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist who develops online self-help substance abuse prevention classes to reduce the risk for substance abuse in at-risk persons.

Monday, March 3, 2014

Alcohol Drug Awareness, Minor in Possession, Minor in Consumption Online for Court Requirements

Online Minor in Possession Class
Online Substance Abuse Education Program, Alcohol Drug Awareness, Minor in Possession, Minor in Consumption and Drug Diversion Classes

Did you get a DUI, MIP, Alcohol or Drug charge / arrest and need to complete a court ordered Minor in Possession or Alcohol Drug Awareness Class?

Our online classes have been accepted by most states, courts, judges, attorneys, probation, parole, employers, colleges and universities to meet court, agency, employment and student requirements for a DUI, Alcohol Drug Awareness, Minor in Possession, Minor in Consumption, or Drug charge, as well as meeting requirements for education for employment or college and university enrollment. Please get court or agency approval before enrolling.

4 hour online Minor in Possession class : $75.00
8 hour online Alcohol Drug Awareness / Level 1 Class : $150.00
12 hour online Alcohol Drug Awareness / Level 2 Class : $225.00
16 hour online Alcohol Drug Awareness / Level 2 Class : $300.00
20 hour online Alcohol Drug Awareness / Level 3 Class : $375.00
24 hour online Alcohol Drug Awareness / Level 3 Class : $225.00

Drug Diversion Programs:

24 hour online Drug Diversion class : $450.00

Complete DUI, Alcohol Awareness, Minor in Possession, Drug Diversion Programs Online for court with Certified Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist. Includes FREE 60 minute Victim Impact Panel for Court Requirements.

Tom Wilson Counseling Center and TeleHealth has been providing approved classes online since 2004 for DUI, Alcohol, Drug, Anger Management, Conflict Management, Petty Theft Shoplifting, Traffic Safety, Parent Education, Thinking Errors, Cognitive Self Change, and DUI, Alcohol, Drug Evaluations. Instructor credentials can be viewed here: www.tomwilsoncounseling.com.

Contact us at support@twccsolutions.com or call Toll Free 1.877.368.9909 during office hours; Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm MDT/MST with questions. If you call before or after our regular office hours, please leave a message and we will return your call as soon as possible.

www.tomwilsoncounseling.com

Friday, September 13, 2013

Negative Effects of Alcohol on College Students

College Students and Drinking

Courtesy of Tom Wilson Counseling Online Classes

Think Safety First

An estimated 599,000 college students suffered alcohol-related injuries nationwide in 2011.

Approximately 1,800 college students die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries each year.

Strive for a Healthy Body and a Healthy Mind

One long island ice tea cocktail has up to 520 calories. That’s the same caloric content as a Quarter-Pounder with cheese from McDonald’s.

Do you think light beer will help you cut back on calories?  Think again.  Just one 12 oz Bud Light has 110 calories, but most people don’t have just one beer. If you drink five bottles of Bud Light you will consume the same number of calories that are in a small, healthy meal.

Save Your Money

If a student goes out to drink 3 nights per week and has 3 drinks per night, they will spend about $2,000 each semester.

The cost of replacing your lost cell phone is $100-$400.

The cost of missing 1 class due to a hangover can be as high as $200.

The cost of a DUI = $10,000 to $20,000. This depends on where you live.

Adding Up the Hours

How long does it take you to recover from a hangover?  How many nights do you regret and wish you could get back?

How else could this time be spent?

How about spending more time doing the things you actually like? You’d be surprised, how much more time you actually have after cutting out a few drinks on your night out. 

Maintain Your Image - It Could Affect Your Future

Photos of your night out can and do end up on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more. Your future employer will be looking.

37% of employers admit to using social media to pre-screen job applicants. 34% of these employers have not hired someone because of content they found on social media accounts.

What if your friends captured your night on video camera--would you like the person you see?

Keep People Close

Let’s face it, we’re different people after too many drinks. Don’t let alcohol get in the way of your relationships. One bad night could ruin a relationship or destroy a friendship.

According to one study, friends, roommates, and bystanders reported experiencing the following with students who had drank too much:

-23% had experienced an unwanted sexual advance
-11% had been pushed, hit, or assaulted
-36% had been insulted or humiliated
-16% had property damaged
-71% had sleep or study interrupted

What are you doing or saying that you don’t recall because you were blackout drunk? Have you lost any friends? 

Don't Let Your Grades Suffer

One university found that the median GPA for their first-year students who were treated for a binge-drinking episode was almost a third of a point below that of their class.  This put them in the bottom 25 percent of their class.

Sources: 
BeWise.syr.edu from Syracuse University (http://bewise.syr.edu)
College Drinking – Changing the Culture (http://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov)

Sunday, July 7, 2013

How You Can Avoid Costly Mistakes When Enrolling in an Online Alcohol Drug Class 
© 2013 Thomas Wilson, Director Tom Wilson Counseling Center 

If you have been charged with an alcohol or drug offense and been to court, then enrolling in an online alcohol drug class may be part of your obligations to the court. This is usually required by the court before the court releases you from supervision.

However, a simple mistake such as choosing the wrong class or choosing the wrong online alcohol drug class provider could get you into even more trouble with the court.  If you want to resolve your case quickly, avoid these common mistakes.

Mistake # 1: Enrolling in a class from a provider that does not have the proper credentials or is not accredited.

Online Alcohol Drug Awareness Classes are taught by professionals who are certified or licensed in their state. If you are unsure, ask for a copy of their license or check their credentials at the court.

Mistake #2: Enrolling in the wrong class.  Be sure to enroll in the right class that is required by the court and that fits with your work schedule.

Normally these classes are called alcohol or drug awareness classes and are 4 to 32 hours in length.  Be sure to check the required number of hours to avoid paying more than is required by your court order. Some providers may not give you a specific number of hours or weeks, so be wary of programs that won't give an estimated length of treatment. Licensed course providers should be happy to help you find the right class and works around your work schedule.

Mistake #3: Enrolling in an online class without getting approval from your court or agency.

An approved course provider will not encourage you to sign up unless you have gotten permission from the court or agency that requires the class.  Be sure you have permission from the court, agency or your attorney to take the class.  Be sure to tell them about your work schedule so that you have access any time of day or night. It’s always a good idea to check in advance.

Mistake #4: Enrolling in the cheapest class.

Just because the class is the cheapest, does not necessarily mean it will cost the least in the long run. Some providers charge extra for certificates or other paper work required by the court. Inquire about all the costs involved in getting proof of enrollment, progress reports to court or probation, additional "enrollment fees" and certificates of completion. Approved providers should disclose all costs in advance.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Alabama DUI Laws

Courtesy of Tom Wilson Counseling Center

Alabama DUI Laws

Section 32-5A-191

Driving while under influence of alcohol, controlled substances, etc.

(a) A person shall not drive or be in actual physical control of any vehicle while:
(1) There is 0.08 percent or more by weight of alcohol in his or her blood;
(2) Under the influence of alcohol;
(3) Under the influence of a controlled substance to a degree which renders him or her incapable of safely driving;
(4) Under the combined influence of alcohol and a controlled substance to a degree which renders him or her incapable of safely driving; or
(5) Under the influence of any substance which impairs the mental or physical faculties of such person to a degree which renders him or her incapable of safely driving.
(b) A person who is under the age of 21 years shall not drive or be in actual physical control of any vehicle if there is .02 percentage or more by weight of alcohol in his or her blood. The Department of Public Safety shall suspend or revoke the driver's license of any person, including, but not limited to, a juvenile, child, or youthful offender, convicted or adjudicated of, or subjected to a finding of delinquency based on this subsection. Notwithstanding the foregoing, upon the first violation of this subsection by a person whose blood alcohol level is between .02 and .08, the person's driver's license or driving privilege shall be suspended for a period of 30 days in lieu of any penalties provided in subsection (e) of this section and there shall be no disclosure, other than to courts, law enforcement agencies, and the person's employer, by any entity or person of any information, documents, or records relating to the person's arrest, conviction, or adjudication of or finding of delinquency based on this subsection.
All persons, except as otherwise provided in this subsection for a first offense, including, but not limited to, a juvenile, child, or youthful offender, convicted or adjudicated of, or subjected to a finding of delinquency based on this subsection shall be fined pursuant to this section, notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, and the person shall also be required to attend and complete a DUI or substance abuse court referral program in accordance with subsection (i).
(c)(1) A school bus or day care driver shall not drive or be in actual physical control of any vehicle while in performance of his or her duties if there is greater than .02 percentage by weight of alcohol in his or her blood. A person convicted pursuant to this subsection shall be subject to the penalties provided by this section except that on the first conviction the Director of Public Safety shall suspend the driving privilege or driver's license for a period of one year.
(2) A person shall not drive or be in actual physical control of a commercial motor vehicle as defined in 49 CFR Part 390.5 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations as adopted pursuant to Section 32-9A-2, if there is .04 percentage or greater by weight of alcohol in his or her blood. Notwithstanding the other provisions of this section, the commercial driver's license or commercial driving privilege of a person convicted of violating this subdivision shall be suspended for the period provided in accordance with 49 CFR Part 383.51 or 49 CFR Part 391.15, as applicable, and the person's regular driver's license or privilege to drive a regular motor vehicle shall be governed by the remainder of this section if the person is guilty of a violation of another provision of this section.
(d) The fact that any person charged with violating this section is or has been legally entitled to use alcohol or a controlled substance shall not constitute a defense against any charge of violating this section.
(e) Upon first conviction, a person violating this section shall be punished by imprisonment in the county or municipal jail for not more than one year, or by fine of not less than six hundred dollars ($600) nor more than two thousand one hundred dollars ($2,100), or by both a fine and imprisonment. In addition, on a first conviction, the Director of Public Safety shall suspend the driving privilege or driver's license of the person convicted for a period of 90 days.
(f) On a second conviction within a five-year period, a person convicted of violating this section shall be punished by a fine of not less than one thousand one hundred dollars ($1,100) nor more than five thousand one hundred dollars ($5,100) and by imprisonment, which may include hard labor in the county or municipal jail for not more than one year. The sentence shall include a mandatory sentence, which is not subject to suspension or probation, of imprisonment in the county or municipal jail for not less than five days or community service for not less than 30 days. In addition the Director of Public Safety shall revoke the driving privileges or driver's license of the person convicted for a period of one year.
(g) On a third conviction, a person convicted of violating this section shall be punished by a fine of not less than two thousand one hundred dollars ($2,100) nor more than ten thousand one hundred dollars ($10,100) and by imprisonment, which may include hard labor, in the county or municipal jail for not less than 60 days nor more than one year, to include a minimum of 60 days which shall be served in the county or municipal jail and cannot be probated or suspended. In addition, the Director of Public Safety shall revoke the driving privilege or driver's license of the person convicted for a period of three years.
(h) On a fourth or subsequent conviction, a person convicted of violating this section shall be guilty of a Class C felony and punished by a fine of not less than four thousand one hundred dollars ($4,100) nor more than ten thousand one hundred dollars ($10,100) and by imprisonment of not less than one year and one day nor more than 10 years. Any term of imprisonment may include hard labor for the county or state, and where imprisonment does not exceed three years confinement may be in the county jail. Where imprisonment does not exceed one year and one day, confinement shall be in the county jail. The minimum sentence shall include a term of imprisonment for at least one year and one day, provided, however, that there shall be a minimum mandatory sentence of 10 days which shall be served in the county jail. The remainder of the sentence may be suspended or probated, but only if as a condition of probation the defendant enrolls and successfully completes a state certified chemical dependency program recommended by the court referral officer and approved by the sentencing court. Where probation is granted, the sentencing court may, in its discretion, and where monitoring equipment is available, place the defendant on house arrest under electronic surveillance during the probationary term. In addition to the other penalties authorized, the Director of Public Safety shall revoke the driving privilege or driver's license of the person convicted for a period of five years.
The Alabama habitual felony offender law shall not apply to a conviction of a felony pursuant to this subsection, and a conviction of a felony pursuant to this subsection shall not be a felony conviction for purposes of the enhancement of punishment pursuant to Alabama's habitual felony offender law.
(i) In addition to the penalties provided herein, any person convicted of violating this section shall be referred to the court referral officer for evaluation and referral to appropriate community resources. The defendant shall, at a minimum, be required to complete a DUI or substance abuse court referral program approved by the Administrative Office of Courts and operated in accordance with provisions of the Mandatory Treatment Act of 1990, Sections 12-23-1 to 12-23-19, inclusive. The Department of Public Safety shall not reissue a driver's license to a person convicted under this section without receiving proof that the defendant has successfully completed the required program.
(j) Neither reckless driving nor any other traffic infraction is a lesser included offense under a charge of driving under the influence of alcohol or of a controlled substance.
(k) Except for fines collected for violations of this section charged pursuant to a municipal ordinance, fines collected for violations of this section shall be deposited to the State General Fund; however, beginning October 1, 1995, of any amount collected over two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for a first conviction, over five hundred dollars ($500) for a second conviction within five years, over one thousand dollars ($1,000) for a third conviction within five years, and over two thousand dollars ($2,000) for a fourth or subsequent conviction within five years, the first one hundred dollars ($100) of that additional amount shall be deposited to the Alabama Chemical Testing Training and Equipment Trust Fund, after three percent of the one hundred dollars ($100) is deducted for administrative costs, and beginning October 1, 1997, and thereafter, the second one hundred dollars ($100) of that additional amount shall be deposited in the Impaired Drivers Trust Fund after deducting five percent of the one hundred dollars ($100) for administrative costs and the remainder of the funds shall be deposited to the State General Fund. Fines collected for violations of this section charged pursuant to a municipal ordinance where the total fine is paid at one time shall be deposited as follows: The first three hundred fifty dollars ($350) collected for a first conviction, the first six hundred dollars ($600) collected for a second conviction within five years, the first one thousand one hundred dollars ($1,100) collected for a third conviction, and the first two thousand one hundred dollars ($2,100) collected for a fourth or subsequent conviction shall be deposited to the State Treasury with the first one hundred dollars ($100) collected for each conviction credited to the Alabama Chemical Testing Training and Equipment Trust Fund and the second one hundred dollars ($100) to the Impaired Drivers Trust Fund after deducting five percent of the one hundred dollars ($100) for administrative costs and depositing this amount in the general fund of the municipality, and the balance credited to the State General Fund. Any amounts collected over these amounts shall be deposited as otherwise provided by law. Fines collected for violations of this section charged pursuant to a municipal ordinance, where the fine is paid on a partial or installment basis, shall be deposited as follows: The first two hundred dollars ($200) of the fine collected for any conviction shall be deposited to the State Treasury with the first one hundred dollars ($100) collected for any conviction credited to the Alabama Chemical Testing Training and Equipment Trust Fund and the second one hundred dollars ($100) for any conviction credited to the Impaired Drivers Trust Fund after deducting five percent of the one hundred dollars ($100) for administrative costs and depositing this amount in the general fund of the municipality. The second three hundred dollars ($300) of the fine collected for a first conviction, the second eight hundred dollars ($800) collected for a second conviction, the second one thousand eight hundred dollars ($1,800) collected for a third conviction, and the second three thousand eight hundred dollars ($3,800) collected for a fourth conviction shall be divided with 50 percent of the funds collected to be deposited to the State Treasury to be credited to the State General Fund and 50 percent deposited as otherwise provided by law for municipal ordinance violations. Any amounts collected over these amounts shall be deposited as otherwise provided by law for municipal ordinance violations. Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, 90 percent of any fine assessed and collected for any DUI offense charged by municipal ordinance violation in district or circuit court shall be computed only on the amount assessed over the minimum fine authorized, and upon collection shall be distributed to the municipal general fund with the remaining 10 percent distributed to the State General Fund.
(l) A person who has been arrested for violating this section shall not be released from jail under bond or otherwise, until there is less than the same percent by weight of alcohol in his or her blood as specified in subsection (a)(1) or, in the case of a person who is under the age of 21 years, subsection (b) hereof.
(m) Upon verification that a defendant arrested pursuant to this section is currently on probation from another court of this state as a result of a conviction for any criminal offense, the prosecutor shall provide written or oral notification of the defendant's subsequent arrest and pending prosecution to the court in which the prior conviction occurred.
(n) When any person over the age of 21 years is convicted pursuant to this section and a child under the age of 14 years was present in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the defendant shall be sentenced to double the minimum punishment that the person would have received if the child had not been present in the motor vehicle.
(o) A prior conviction within a five-year period for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs from this state, a municipality within this state, or another state or territory or a municipality of another state or territory shall be considered by a court for imposing a sentence pursuant to this section.
(p) Any person convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol, or a controlled substance, or both, or any substance which impairs the mental or physical faculties in violation of this section, a municipal ordinance adopting this section, or a similar law from another state or territory or a municipality of another state or territory more than once in a five-year period shall have his or her motor vehicle registration for all vehicles owned by the repeat offender suspended by the Alabama Department of Revenue for the duration of the offender's driver's license suspension period, unless such action would impose an undue hardship to any individual, not including the repeat offender, who is completely dependent on the motor vehicle for the necessities of life, including any family member of the repeat offender and any co-owner of the vehicle.
(Acts 1980, No. 80-434, p. 604, §9-102; Acts 1981, No. 81-803, p. 1412, §1; Acts 1983, No. 83-620, p. 959, §1; Acts 1984, No. 84-259, p. 431, §1; Acts 1994, No. 94-590, p. 1089, §1; Acts 1995, No. 95-784, p. 1862, §2; Acts 1996, No. 96-341, p. 416, §1; Acts 1996, No. 96-705, p. 1174, §1; Acts 1997, No. 97-556, p. 985, §1; Act 99-432, p. 787, §1; Act 2000-677, p. 1376, §1; Act 2002-502, p. 1299, §1; Act 2005-326, p. 795, 1st Sp. Sess., §1; Act 2006-654, p. 1787, §1.)
 Source: http://www.legislature.state.al.us/codeofalabama/1975/32-5a-191.htm
 

Monday, June 17, 2013

DUI Court Delays Caused by California Budget Cuts

Recent budget cuts in the California court system have resulted in closed courts, fewer staff and many delays in civil cases, but also in criminal cases such as DUI and drug arrest trials and hearings.

An LA Times article states that the California courts have lost about 65% of their state support in the last 5 years and affects from those cuts are continuing to increase. These cuts are causing delays in hearings and trials, causing records to go unprocessed for many months, and reducing the number of services at public windows.

What does this mean for those arrested for a DUI?

One of the most damaging results of a DUI is the temporary loss of your driver’s license.  Normally, the California DMV will automatically suspend your driver’s license unless you request a DMV hearing within ten days of your arrest.  This delays suspension until the outcome of the hearing is determined.  If you win your hearing, no suspension occurs.  But, how will this affect you if the court delays your hearing due to recent budget cuts? When you do finally have a hearing and the hearing officer decides that the officer reasonably believes that you were driving under the influence, you were lawfully arrested and you had a BAC of 0.08% or higher, then your license will be suspended at that time. With the California court budget cuts, this could mean that the first hearing is delayed by weeks or months and the amount of time without your driver’s license could be devastating to your work and personal life. 

What happens if you get a DUI arrest in California but live in another state?

If you are arrested for a DUI in the State of California but live in another state, the arresting officer will give you notice that your driving privileges in California will be suspended in 30 days. The California DMV is notified and you have 10 days from your arrest to challenge the suspension by requesting a hearing. As mentioned above, the license suspension is delayed until the outcome of the hearing. But with recent budget cuts, does this hearing still take place as quickly as before?  Probably not.  And if you lose the hearing, your driving privileges in California will be suspended for up to 4 months for first offenses and longer for those with previous DUI convictions. 

Other Consequences of a DUI arrest in California for Out-of-State Residents

Suspended driving privileges in California will most likely affect your driver’s license in your home state as well. All but 5 states in the U.S. belong to the Interstate Drivers License Compact (IDLC), which means that your home state will get notified of any driving arrests and will most likely take additional action against your driver’s license and record. The only states that do not belong to the IDLC are Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin.  

Even if you don’t live in California or don’t request a hearing you will be involved in a DUI criminal court proceeding in the State of California. The California Superior Court takes actions that are separate from the California DMV.  These proceedings can be costly and time consuming. It is in your best interest to hire a California DUI attorney to assist you thru the process, especially if you are unable to attend all the court appearances because you live out of state. 

There are a number of hearings and court appearances that may result in reduced or dismissed charges and the case may or may not go to trial.  In either case, the process is going to take much longer with the delays occurring from the California court budget cuts.  

In many cases, your DUI attorney or the judge will recommend court approved online DUI Alcohol Programs as part of your sentence. Tom Wilson Counseling Center provides online DUI classes specifically designed for out-of-state residents that received a DUI in the State of California.

Register online for the following online classes.  We accept VISA, MasterCard, Discover and American Express, as well as debit cards.  If you need to arrange to make payments, please call our office directly at 1.877.368.9909, Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm MST.